MA Courses 2013-14

The following is a preliminary list of the MA courses planned for the three campuses in 2013-14. Modifications in the course offerings will occur and (where anticipated) are noted below. The list is intended to provide students with information on our offerings on a regular and on-going basis.


Fall 2013

University of Waterloo

HIST 601 – Canadian History I (H. MacDougall)
Mon 2:30-4:30pm
Location: HH-123

In this course, students will examine the many genres of Canadian history and discuss their relevance to contemporary issues. Topics such as biographical, environmental, gender, aboriginal, social and medical history will provide an introduction to current literature and its applications. In addition to participation and leadership in the weekly seminars, students will prepare a bibliographic proposal for an historiographical paper on one of the course topics, and, after it has been approved, research and write a 30-page analysis.

 

HIST 606 – International Development in Historical Perspective (B. Muirhead)
Mon 12:30-2:20pm
Location: HH-259

This course examines the theory of international development and how it has been applied in practice. As well, students will assess the records of various international actors in terms of their success or failure in providing development assistance. They will also study the interactions between international organizations, states, non-governmental organizations and more informal interest groups through their involvement in overseas development assistance. Finally, the role played by the Cold War in determining Overseas Development Assistance priorities will be examined.

 

HIST 607 – Human Rights I (J. Walker)
Tues 2:30-04:30
Location: HH 123

The course will examine developments in human rights, primarily during the twentieth century. Weekly discussions based on assigned readings will offer students an opportunity to explore such questions as: What are “human rights” and how are they different from any other rights? Where do human rights come from? Why do they change over time, and by whom and by what means are changes effected? Is there a role for the historian in explaining this process, and can the lessons of history be applied to public policy and to continuing human rights issues? The focus for our study is the formation and evolution of international human rights, but with attention paid to Canadian events to assess the relationship between domestic and global human rights innovations.

 

HIST 620 – Early Modern History (G. Kroeker)
Tues 12:30-2:30pm
Location: HH-123

This seminar will explore the relationship between religion and violence in Early Modern Europe and will focus on the interaction of religion and violence in the contexts of the European Witch Craze, transatlantic encounters, and the Reformations. Students will be expected to read deeply in the historiography, write analyses of assigned works, lead discussions, and produce a historiographical paper.

 

Wilfrid Laurier University

HI610A – War & Society in the 20th Century (R. Sarty)
Thurs 1:00 – 3:50 pm
Location: tba

 

HI625A – Canada’s First Nations (S. Neylan)
Tues 10:00 – 12:50 pm
Location: DAWB 3-108

This course focuses on recent trends in Canadian Aboriginal Historiography, from tales of since time immemorial to the (post) colonial gaze. A selected number of themes and approaches will be considered with special attention given to understanding how Native history is (re)interpreted by a variety of disciplines and by both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal historians.

 

HI696G – Stalinism (L. Friesen)
Wed 2:30 – 5:20 pm
Location: tba

Gangnam Style, Justin Bieber, Senate scandal, and Rob Ford. These Keywords are part of our cultural milieu whether we like it or not. But about Soviet culture in Stalin’s time? This seminar will explore the Keywords that comprised Stalinist culture and politics from roughtly 1917 to 1953. Topics to be discussed include: the cult of Stalin; state and society during the Leningrad blockade; and the purges, police and Stalinist repression that characterized the Soviet modernizing project.

 

University of Guelph

HIST*6000 – Historiography I (S. Ferreira)
Wed 11:30 am – 2:30 pm
Location: CRSC 101

This course examines historical writing from the classical period to WWI and aims to introduce students to the broad topic of historiography. Students will learn about the ways in which the ideology of history changed over the centuries as well as different forms of historical writing.

 

HIST*6190 – Topics in Scottish History (E. Ewan)
Tues 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Location: MACK 342

This course provides an introduction to Scottish history, its themes, debates, and sources. The period covered will depend on the research interests of the students in the course. The course will begin with an overview of Scottish history from c.1000. Students will be introduced to the skills required for using Scottish primary sources and given some practical experience in using them, both in reading historic handwriting and in analysing them. Drawing on documents from the University of Guelph’s Scottish Collection, students will choose a particular document and present their findings to the class. The final part of the course examines particular themes in Scottish history, with students being asked to relate their own thesis work to the issues under discussion. The themes chosen will depend on the research interests of the students in the course. For example, a student working on Canadian urban history could examine Scottish urban history; a student working on the Scottish Wars of Independence could examine work on Anglo-Scottish relations in the Middle Ages. Among other potential topics are the history of crime, women’s history, religious history, crown-noble relations, the Reformation, and national identity.

 

HIST*6230 – Canada: Culture and Society (A. Gordon)
Mon 7:00 – 10:00 pm
Location: MACK 119

This year’s theme will be spectacle, spectators, and display. The course will entail a cultural history examination of a variety of spectacles and performances from Canada’s past. Weekly seminars will be devoted to discussions of specific works and built around common themes in the readings. Special attention will be paid to the methodology of cultural history. Written assignments will include a book review essay and primary source-based assignment on a specific spectacle or performance to be determined by the student in consultation with the professor. This assignment is intended to introduce students to cultural history methodologies in their own field of interest (not restricted to Canada).

 

HIST*6370 – Topics in Cultural History (K. James)
Mon 11:30 am -2:30 pm
Location: MACK 342

In this course, we will explore themes of travel, mobility, stasis and intercultural encounter through the prism of the hotel — a complex institution located at the heart of modern travel systems. The course will focus on histories and theories of modern travel, the rural inn, the rise of the grand hotel, and on such topics as hotels and scandal, and the hotel lobby as a site of circulation. Course assessments will include seminar participation, a bibliographic review, and a major essay.

 

Winter 2014

University of Waterloo

HIST 602 – Canadian History II (H. MacDougall)
Mondays, 2:30-4:20
Location: HH-123

History 602 is a research course in Canadian history. Students will have a choice of two options to demonstrate their grasp of scholarly research and communication methods:

A.      A 25-30 page research essay based on primary sources on a topic related to their thesis or MRP;

B.      A group project which will research, write and produce a digital game or exhibit illustrating a specific event in Canadian history.

Both options will be graded on an individual basis. The essay mark will be divided into five components: 10% for the proposal and annotated bibliography, 10% for the outline, 20% for the draft essay, 10% for student’s contributions to assessing their classmates’ work, and 50% for the final essay. The group project assessment rubric will consist of the following: 10% for the component of the proposal and bibliography that each team member provides, 30% for the research report on each individual section of the project, 30% for the story boards or script segments, 20% for commentary on production activities, and 10% for a reflective analysis of the project and team experience.

 

HIST 608 – Human Rights II (J. Walker)
Wednesdays, 2:30-4:20
Location: PAS 2084

In this sequel to HIST 607, students will have an opportunity to pursue a primary research project on an approved topic in the history of human rights. A series of progress meetings and research consultations will lead towards a “conference” where students will present their own research and comment on their classmates’ draft papers.

 

HIST 632 – US History I (A. Hunt)
Mondays, 10:30-12:20
Location: PAS 2085

 

HIST 627 – European History (G. Bruce)
Tuesdays, 2:30-4:20
Location: HH-124

Since 1989, the year of dramatic revolution in Germany, historians have sifted through the mammoth holdings of the former Communist dictatorship, especially the paper legacy of the Communist Party and its notorious secret police, the Stasi, and in so doing have produced compelling accounts of the former East Germany. As such, it is now possible to compare various aspects of “the second German dictatorship” with the earlier, and better known, Nazi dictatorship. In this course, we will explore both dictatorships thematically, comparing issues such as policing, resistance, the experience of social groups, and the demise of the regimes. Students will be introduced to the value of comparative history.

 

HIST 660 – Transnational and Global History: Old Problems and New Directions (D. Peers)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:20
Location: PAS 2084

History as a profession and a discipline is intimately linked to the rise of the nation-state and began to coalesce around the time of the zenith of European imperialism. Not surprisingly, it has tended to employ the nation state as its fundamental referent, or at least used the nation-state as a convenient framing device. Intellectual trends, such as post-modernism and post-colonialism, and historical events, such as the ending of the Cold War, globalization, environmental degradation that knows no political boundaries, and mass migrations and the ensuing diasporas, have called into question conventional teleology as well as the practice of constraining ourselves to national boundaries, and provoked historians to think through and across the national and regional boundaries that have hitherto occupied our attention.

This course examines transnational and global historical processes, focussing on temporal and geographic scales of analysis outside of traditional national histories, and promotes linking the local and the global. It looks at global forces influencing particular societies and encourages students to place themselves outside conventional local, regional, and national boundaries, and will critically consider a number of the metanarratives that have informed and continue to inform historiography, particularly ideas such as modernity, progress, and the ongoing preoccupation with the ‘rise of the west’. Given these questions, and the almost endless scope of a course that purports to take the world as its focal point, weekly seminars will begin with a discussion of the possibilities offered by as well as the limits to transnational/global/world history, the various interpretative frameworks in use and their proponents as well as the challenges that transnational/global/world history poses. We will then focus on particular case studies or themes so as to promote discussion that is as much historiographical as it is historical. Such themes/case studies may include: feminism and imperialism, famine and climatic change, disease and ecology, military technology and governmentality, global trade and the rise of consumer society(s), colonial knowledge and shifting ideas of race.

 

Wilfrid Laurier University

HI610B – War & Society in the 20th Century (R. Sarty)
Thurs 1:00 – 3:50 pm
Location: DAWB 5-101

 

HI625B – Canada’s First Nations (S. Neylan)
Tues 10:00 – 12:50 pm
Location: DAWB 3-108

Hi625B builds on the content and experiences students were introduced to in Hi625A, the Historiography of Canada’s First Nations, by allowing them to engage in doing Native history themselves. In this research seminar students will formulate a research project and process for a topic in Canadian Aboriginal History of their choosing. With close and regular consultations with the instructor, through presentations and peer-reviewing of their fellow students’ work, the ultimate goal of this course is the production of an article-length major research essay (30-35 pages).

 

HI696H – Stalinism (L. Friesen)
Wed 2:30 – 5:20 pm
Location: DAWB 5-101

Gangnam Style, Justin Bieber, Senate scandal, and Rob Ford. These Keywords are part of our cultural milieu whether we like it or not. But about Soviet culture in Stalin’s time? This seminar will explore the Keywords that comprised Stalinist culture and politics from roughtly 1917 to 1953. Topics to be discussed include: the cult of Stalin; state and society during the Leningrad blockade; and the purges, police and Stalinist repression that characterized the Soviet modernizing project.

 

University of Guelph

HIST*6020 – Historiography II (J. Palsetia)
Tues 8:30-11:30 am
Location: MACK 261

An examination of major examples of recent historical methodology, including works in cultural and social history.  The student is also expected to develop and present a thesis proposal.

 

HIST*6200 – Topics in Scottish History II (tba)
Fri 11:30 am-2:30 pm
Location: tba

 

HIST*6280 – Canada: Community & Identity (C. Wilson)
Tues 2:30-5:30 pm
Location: MACK 231

The class will use a fascinating collection of documents and artifacts to create a display case celebrating 90 years of COLLEGE ROYAL, its history of agricultural competitions, square dancing, cat shows, the Royal ball and oddities in glass jars on view at the Veterinary College during this annual open house.  This special project will replace the historiographical essay.  Work with diaries written by farm and non-farm people living in the countryside will be the other assignment accompanying the seminars.

 

Spring 2014

Wilfrid Laurier University

HI696U – Vietnam War (B. Chiasson)
May 8th to June 12th
Tues & Thurs, 1-3:50pm
Location: DAWB 4-106

This course will examine Vietnamese history from the period of French colonial rule (1850-1945) and the first and second Vietnamese wars (1950 -1975). Students will be reading in the historiography of all periods in the French, Vietnamese, (both in English translation) and English language literature. In this full credit course there will be seminar classes, a research paper proposal, a historiographical paper on your chosen topic and a research paper.

 

HI696V – Vietnam War (B. Chiasson)
July 3rd to August 7th
Tues & Thurs, 1-3:50pm
Location: tba

This course will examine Vietnamese history from the period of French colonial rule (1850-1945) and the first and second Vietnamese wars (1950 -1975). Students will be reading in the historiography of all periods in the French, Vietnamese, (both in English translation) and English language literature. In this full credit course there will be seminar classes, a research paper proposal, a historiographical paper on your chosen topic and a research paper.