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Tri-University History Conference Fall 2010

Cold War Encounters: National, International, and Transnational History in the 20th Century

Saturday, 16 October 2010
University of Waterloo, Arts Lecture Hall (campus map)

This year’s conference focuses on the theme “Cold War Encounters,” which coincides with the recent creation of the Cold War History Field at the Ph.D. level. It will spotlight an exciting diversity of a global scholarship. The preliminary program below will give you a sense of the scope of papers being presented.

This year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Fredrik Logevall, the John S. Knight Professor of International Studies at Cornell University and author of several books, including the highly acclaimed Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam. One of the most highly regarded Cold War historians of our time, Dr. Logevall is a popular lecturer at universities around the world and is currently researching a biography of former U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara.

Program

Cold War Encounters – Preliminary Program (PDF)

15 January 2010 – Dr. Jane Errington

All members of the Tri-University Community are invited to attend a
lecture presented by

Elizabeth Jane Errington, Professor and Dean of Arts, Royal Military
College

“RMC and Becoming an Imperial Gentleman:  A Preliminary Study of
Masculinity, Nationhood and Empire”

Friday, January 15, 2010
MacKinnon Building, Room 132
University of Guelph

Dr. Errington is author of  Emigrant Worlds and Transatlantic Communities.

Faculty interest tag cloud

December 9, 2009: Author! Author!

Please join the Waterloo History Department on Wednesday, December 9, 2009 from 2:00 – 4:00 in the UW Bookstore to celebrate the achievements of the History Professors listed below. Each Professor will have a few minutes to speak about their recent work.

  • John English-“Just Watch Me: The Life of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, 1968-2000”
  • Gail Cuthbert-Brandt-“Bold and Courageous Dreams: A History of Renison University College, 1959-2009”
  • Julia Roberts-“In Mixed Company: Taverns and Public Life in Upper Canada”
  • Ken Coates and Whitney Lackenbauer-“Arctic Front: Defending Canadian Interests in the Far North” (attendance tentative)
  • Andrew Hunt-“The 1980s: Social History of the United States”
  • Coming soon-Lynne Taylor-“Polish Orphans of Tengeru: The Dramatic Story of their Long Journey to Canada, 1941-49

Light refreshments provided.

PhD Program Information

The Tri-University’s PhD program in History is innovatively designed so that it can be completed in four years of full-time study. Students generally participate in three field seminars in their first year and sit their major field exam in their fourth registration term.

The fields serve to provide students with teachable areas and to advance them on their dissertation research. Because students are able to move through the field completion phase of their degree in one year, they can devote the majority of their studies to their own research, teaching, and writing. In this way, the program succeeds in combining solid field training within a four-year completion structure without compromise to the student’s research, professional development or writing.

Other innovative features of the program include the presentation of a portion of the dissertation in a colloquium setting, a first year professional development seminar and a fourth-year teaching practicum. The teaching practicum gives each eligible doctoral student the opportunity to teach a course of their own with the advice of an academic mentor. For more information on the program, please consult the most recent PhD Handbook.

News and Events

Rural History Roundtable Speaker Series, Winter 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MA Program Information

Historical classroom

M.A. graduates from our universities have pursued careers in business and law, politics, journalism, government service, teaching, museums and archives, to name only some of the general areas in which history graduates may be found. Some M.A. students choose a graduate program in history for no other reason than that they enjoy the study of history and realize that it can enhance their understanding of themselves and the world in which they live. For others, the Tri-University M.A. in history may also be seen as an opportunity to test their ability in a graduate program or to see if they have an interest in pursuing a Ph.D. degree, or perhaps through a Teaching Assistantship to sample the experience of participating in the teaching of university level courses. An Tri-University M.A. offers you the prospect of being part of an exciting program built on the strength of three of Ontario’s finest universities.

Students may complete the MA program at the TriU in several ways: by coursework, by a combination of coursework and a major research paper, or by coursework and an MA thesis. We also offer full-time and part-time programs. Students generally take courses at all three campuses, though they will normally choose their major research paper or thesis advisor from faculty at their home university. The MA program is designed to be completed in two or three terms of full-time study. For more information on the program, please consult the most recent MA handbook.

Tri-University History Conference Spring 2010

Minorities, Rights & the State

Minorities, Rights & the State

27 February 2010
University of Guelph
MacDonald Stewart Hall
(School of Hospitality and Tourism Management)

The preliminary conference schedule is now available:

Final Conference Schedule (PDF)

Conference Travel Information (PDF)

Guelph Campus Map (PDF)

Plenary Speaker: Rashid Khalidi (Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies, Columbia University)

“The History of the 20th Century Viewed from the Middle East.”

Professor Khalidi is editor of the Journal of Palestine Studies, and was President of the Middle East Studies Association, and an advisor to the Palestinian delegation to the Madrid and Washington Arab-Israeli peace negotiations from  October 1991 until June 1993. He is author of Sowing Crisis: American Dominance and the Cold War in the Middle East (2009); The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood (2006); Resurrecting Empire: Western Footprints and America’s Perilous Path in  the Middle East (2004); Palestinian Identity: The Construction of Modern National Consciousness (1996); Under Siege: PLO Decision-Making  During the 1982 War (1986); and British Policy Towards Syria and Palestine, 1906-1914 (1980), and was the co-editor of Palestine and the Gulf (1982) and The Origins of Arab Nationalism (1991).

Tri-University History Conference 2008

15 November 2008

Imperialisms: New and Old

This year’s conference is bigger and more international than ever before and promises to provide students and faculty with opportunities to make new contacts and experience the diversity of a global scholarship.

This year’s keynote speaker, Roderick MacFarquhar, will be speaking on “China’s Struggle with Imperialism”. Dr. MacFarquhar is the Leroy B. Williams Professor of History and Political Science and former Director of the John King Fairbank Center for East Asian Research. His publications include The Hundred Flowers Campaign and the Chinese Intellectuals (1960), The Sino-Soviet Dispute (1961), China under Mao (1966); Sino-American Relations, 1949-1971 (1972); the three volume The Origins of the Cultural Revolution (1974-1997); and his most recent, jointly-authored book (with Michael Schoenhals), is Mao’s Last Revolution (2006).

Session Topics

Session A:

  • Colonialism and Resistance in Southern Africa
  • Exhibiting Empire
  • Special Tri-University Student Session on War Crimes
  • Empires of Science and Technology

Session B:

  • Protest and Empowerment
  • Religion and Empire
  • Empire by Negotiation
  • Storytelling and the Postcolonial Exotic
  • Special Tri-University Student Session on Modern European Fascism and Communism

Session C:

  • Japan, Russia and Asian Imperialism
  • New Imperialisms
  • The Play of Identities
  • Special Tri-University Student Session: Women and Power in the Middle Ages

Reception music provided by the Bremen String Quartet

Preliminary Conference Program 2008 (.doc)

Professional Development Seminar

The Tri-University Professional Development Seminar is designed to guide students through doctoral studies in history and to prepare them for the their future careers. The course will examine different aspects of the historian’s work in applied ways. Faculty from the three participating departments will introduce students to the various aspects of the historian’s work and offer tips for students looking to enhance their teaching and publishing record, and help increase their odds at securing funding and being hired.

Professional-Development-Seminar-2016-17

Past Professional Development Seminar Content

Professional Development Seminar 2011-12 (.doc)

Professional Development Seminar 2010-11 (.doc)

Professional Development Seminar 2009-10 (.doc)

Professional Development Seminar 2008-9 (.doc)

Professional Development Seminar 2012-13 (PDF)

Dana Weiner

Tri-University Graduate Student Association

The Tri-University Graduate Student Association aims to bring all the students of the Tri-U History Program together for social activities and learning opportunities. In the future, the relationships you build with the students at Waterloo, Guelph and Wilfrid Laurier may also help your professional ambitions.

In March 2008, we drafted a constitution to identify our objectives, executive structure, electoral processes, finances, and other such matters.

The TUGSA executive has planned a number of student events over the years:

  • “How to Apply for a PhD” info sessions for MA students (December/January)
  • “Non-Academic Careers” info sessions for Graduate students
  • History & Film Nights featuring faculty lectures
  • Regular pub nights
  • Holiday Social (December)
  • Ice Skating (January/February)
  • Grand River Canoe Trip (April)

Ideas for other events are always welcome!

To contact us, please write to tugsamail@gmail.com

Join our Facebook group.

 

TUGSA Documents

Constitution

TUGSA Constitution

Annual Reports

Annual Report 2012-2013

  Annual Report 2011-2012

Annual Report 2010-2011

Annual Report 2009-2010

General Meeting Minutes

19 Mar 2014

15 Jan 2014

19 Oct 2013

04 April 2013

 30 Jan 2013

Ritchie, Elizabeth M. J. (2010) – “The Faith of the Crofters: Christian Identity in the Hebrides, 1793-1843”

Kevin James

Stuart McCook

Donna Andrew

Tri-University History Conference 2007

10 November 2007

‘Nationalism, Identity and International/Cross-Cultural Conflict.’

The 2007 Tri-University History Conference was held at St. George Hall in Waterloo. Thirty faculty and students from Canadian, American, European and Middle Eastern universities presented at the conference. Topics included, but were not limited to:

  • West and East, “Old Europe”, “New Europe” and the US (dialogues and strains)
  • Imperialism, colonialism, multiculturalism and globalisation
  • Borderlands (ethnicity, culture, religion, migrations and diasporas)
  • Ideologies and their impact
  • Radicalism, violence and war (conventional, religious and ethnic conflicts, genocide, trauma, civil, human rights and peace movements)

In addition, there were two plenary speakers: Professor Francine McKenzie, associate professor of history at the University of Western Ontario, spoke on the subject of ‘Peace, Prosperity and Power: The GATT and Global International Relations 1947-1968.’ Dr McKenzie is the author of two books: Parties Long Estranged: Canada and Australia in the Twentieth Century [with Margaret MacMillan] (2002) and Redefining the Bonds of Commonwealth, 1939-1948 (2002).

The second speaker was Geir Lundestad, professor of history at Oslo University and President and Director of the Nobel Prize Institute. Dr Lundestad addressed the ‘Crisis in American-European Relations Since the End of the Cold War.’ Among Professor Lundestad’s dozen works are: The American Non-Policy towards Eastern Europe 1943-1947 (1975); America, Scandinavia, and the Cold War 1945-1949 (1980); East, West, North, South: Major Developments in International Relations since 1945 (1985); and ‘Empire’ by Integration: the United States and European Integration, 1945-1997 (1998).

Geoffrey Hayes

John English

Kevin Spooner

Linda Mahood

Alan McDougall

Jacqueline Murray

Karen Racine

Susannah Humble Ferreira

Jane Nicholas

Suzanne Zeller

Cynthia Comacchio

Femi Kolapo

Catherine Carstairs

Richard Reid

Terbenche, Danielle (2011) – “Public Servants or Professional Alienists?: Medical Superintendents and the Early Professionalization of Asylum Management and Insanity Treatment in Upper Canada, 1840-1865”

Sica, Emanuele (2011) – “Italiani Brava Gente? The Italian occupation of southeastern France in the Second World War, 1940-1943”

Parker, Heather (2012) – “‘In all Gudly Haste’: The Formation of Marriage in Scotland, c. 1350-1600”

Anderson, Kim (2010) – “Algonquian Women: Life Stage, Gender and Identity, 1930-1960”

MacFadyen, Joshua (2009) – “Fashioning Flax: Industry, Region, and Work in North American Fibre and Linseed Oil, 1850-1930”

Gavin Brockett

Adam Crerar

Douglas Lorimer

Terry Crowley

Gary Bruce

Andrew Hunt

Patrick Harrigan

Steven Bednarski

Marlene Epp

Alan Gordon

Contact Information

Program Administration

Tri-University Program Administrative Assistant
Colleen Ginn
519-884-1970, ext 3747
Dr. Alvin Woods Building DAWB 4-135 (Mondays through Thursdays, 1 to 4pm)
cginn@wlu.ca

Tri-University Program Director
Dr. Adam Crerar
519-884-0710 ext 3292
Dr. Alvin Woods Building DAWB 4-149
acrerar@wlu.ca

Departmental Graduate Officers

Graduate Officer, University of Waterloo
Dr. Susan Roy
519-888-4567, ext. 32765
Hagey Hall 133
susan.roy@uwaterloo.ca

Graduate Officer, Wilfrid Laurier University
Dr. Susan Neylan
519-884-1970, ext. 3595
Dr. Alvin Woods Building DAWB 4-150
sneylan@wlu.ca

Graduate Officer, University of Guelph
Dr. Tara Abraham
MacKinnon Extension 1003
519-824-4120, ext. 56227
taabraha@uoguelph.ca

Departmental Graduate Administrators

Graduate Secretary, University of Guelph
Audra Bolton
519-824-4120, ext 56528
histgrad@uoguelph.ca

Administrative Assistant, Wilfrid Laurier University
Heather Vogel
519-884-0710, ext 3389
hvogel@wlu.ca

Graduate Administrative Assistant, University of Waterloo
Susan King
519-888-4567, ext 32297
s2king@uwaterloo.ca

Campus Departments

University of Guelph
Department of History
MacKinnon Extension (Campus Map)

University of Waterloo
Department of History
Hagey Hall (Campus Map)

Wilfrid Laurier University
Department of History
Dr. Alvin Woods Building (Campus Map)

Matthew Hayday

Important Dates

January 15th

Laurier M.A. and Ph.D. applications for September entry are due today

February 1st

Waterloo and Guelph M.A. and Ph.D. applications for September entry are due today

March

Conference Travel Award submissions for Doctoral students

April

Doctoral Student Spring Advisory Committee Meetings

September

Orientation for new students

Submissions invited for Best Historiographical Paper (awarded to the student receiving the highest mark for a historiography paper written for a field seminar in the previous year)

Submissions invited for Best Conference Paper Presented or Article Accepted by a Scholarly Journal

October

OGS and SSHRC applications due

Doctoral Student Comprehensive Examinations

Major Field Exams (Doctoral students)

October-November

Tri-University History Conference

December

Doctoral Student Advisory Committee Meetings

Financial Assistance for M.A. Students

Graduate students enrolled in the Tri-University Program are funded according to the scholarship and funding policies prevailing at the university to which they are enrolled. A minimum guaranteed package of funding for MA students is available at some of the participating universities. The funding package offered M.A. students normally include a combination of Graduate Teaching Assistantships and internal scholarships. Incoming and continuing students are strongly encouraged to apply for external scholarships such as OGS and SSHRC. More information on graduate funding can be found by clicking on the links below.

Graduate funding by campus

For other funding information, consult with the university where you are registered:

Conference Travel Funding

Tri-University students seeking travel funding to make conference presentations should print the form below and forward it to the Tri-University Program Director. Funding is subject to availability and submission of this form does not guarantee funding.

Travel Funding Application (PDF)

 

MA Fellowships

MA Fellowships: American Vaudeville MA Research Fellowship

Department of History at Wilfrid Laurier University

Fellowship Amount: One year program funded at $20,000 (includes TA and research stipends)

Additional Research Funding: $1,500 research travel allowance (for conferences or archival visits)

Fellowship Start Date: 1 September 2017

The Department of History at Wilfrid Laurier University invite applications from students interested in working on the American entertainment industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Potential applicants should contact David Monod (Department of History) to discuss the opportunity before 15 January 2016 and indicate WLU as a potential host on any SSHRC MA Fellowship applications.

Fellowship holders will work as team with Dr. Monod and other students, on a SSHRC-sponsored research project to develop the database http://vaudevilleamerica.org/ Vaudeville was America’s most important commercial amusement in the early twentieth century and the database we are preparing will provide the public and professionals with singular insight into a vast, divers and complicated world of popular entertainment. The core of the project involves the accumulation of reviews, images, interpretations and biographical profiles of vaudeville performers over a 30 year period. Fellowship holders will be supported in their own research and presentation work on vaudeville performers, theatres or types of acts. Fellowship holders are expected to provide open access to their research findings and raw data through the database.

Students will apply to this fellowship no later than 15 January 2017 by submitting an application to the Tri-University MA Program in History at Laurier. More information on the Tri-U program and application process is available at: http://www.triuhistory.ca/ma/application-ma/.

For more information please contact Dr. David Monod at dmonod@wlu.ca or 519 884 0710 x. 3261.

 

 

MA Courses

Upcoming Course Offerings
Current and Past Course Offerings

Kris Inwood

Rob Kristofferson

Heather MacDougall

Douglas McCalla

Wendy Mitchinson

Bruce Muirhead

Jeff Grischow

William Cormack

Jesse Palsetia

Sofie Lachapelle

Peter Goddard

Tara Abraham

Graeme Morton

Lynne Taylor

Joyce Lorimer

MA Application Information

Muhammad Ali and the Beatles

Students apply to the Tri-University Graduate Program in History on an application form from one of the three universities participating in the program. Because all applications are processed by a single Tri-University admissions committee, it does not matter which university’s application form you use. However, MA students should fill out the form for their preferred campus. In a link below you will also find a preference form. On this form, applicants to the Master’s program are invited to suggest a research supervisor. Fill in the preference form and include it in your application package. The admissions committee will use your application form together with your preference form when determining the department to which it will recommend your admission.

General Admission Requirements:

In order to be admitted to the master’s program, a student must meet the general admission requirements of Wilfrid Laurier University, the University of Waterloo or the University of Guelph. Generally speaking, a minimum admission average of B+ (77%) in the last two years of undergraduate study is required. Honours graduates in non-history programs and others may be admitted if evidence justifying admission is offered; however, a program of appropriate preparatory studies (qualifying year) may be required of such applicants.

Language Requirements:

Students are expected to be proficient in the language or languages needed in their areas of research.

Application Deadlines:

To be considered in the first round of admissions, applications must be received by 1 February. The admissions committee will, however, continue to review applications received after that date.

Forms:

Instructions for Applicants (PDF)

MA Student Preference Form (PDF)

 

David Murray

Susan Neylan

Tarah Brookfield

Julia Roberts

Erich Haberer

Susan Nance

Eva Plach

Darren Mulloy

Blaine Chiasson

James W. St.G. Walker

Catharine Wilson

Faculty List

Wilfrid Laurier University

Gavin Brockett

Tarah Brookfield

Blaine Chiasson

Cynthia Comacchio

Adam Crerar

Darryl Dee

Peter Farrugia

Karljurgen Feuerherm

Judith Fletcher

Leonard Friesen

Jeff Grischow

Christina Han

Mark Humphries

Rob Kristofferson

Lianne Leddy

Amy Milne-Smith

David Monod

Darren Mulloy

Susan Neylan

Chris Nighman

Eva Plach

Roger Sarty

Michael Sibalis

David Smith

Kevin Spooner

Geoff Spurr

Gary Warwick

Dana Weiner

Suzanne Zeller

University of Waterloo

Steven Bednarski

James Blight

Gary Bruce

Marlene Epp

Dan Gorman

Kimie Hara

Geoffrey Hayes

Andrew Hunt

Jolanta Komornicka

Greta Kroeker

Whitney Lackenbauer

Heather MacDougall

Ian Milligan

Wendy Mitchinson

Bruce Muirhead

Jane Nicholas

Troy Osborne

Doug Peers

Julia Roberts

Susan Roy

John Sbardellati

Alex Statiev

Lynne Taylor

Ryan Touhey

James W. St.G. Walker

University of Guelph

Tara Abraham

Catherine Carstairs

William Cormack

Elizabeth Ewan

James Fraser

Peter Goddard

Alan Gordon

Matthew Hayday

Susannah Humble Ferreira

Kris Inwood

Kevin James

Femi Kolapo

Sofie Lachapelle

Brittany Luby

Stuart McCook

Alan McDougall

Linda Mahood

Jacqueline Murray

Susan Nance

Jesse Palsetia

Karen Racine

Norman Smith

Catharine Wilson

Renée Worringer

Retired and Emeriti

Donna Andrew

Keith Cassidy

Terry Copp

Gail Cuthbert Brandt

Terry Crowley

John English

Erich Haberer

Patrick Harrigan

John Laband

Doug Lorimer

Joyce Lorimer

Douglas McCalla

Ken McLaughlin

David Murray

Richard Reid

PhD Application Information

Application Process

Students must apply to the Tri-University Program on-line through one of the three participating universities: University of Guelph, University of Waterloo, Wilfrid Laurier University. Because all applications are processed by a single Tri-University admissions committee, it does not matter which university’s application system you use. However, PhD applicants should use the system of the university of their preferred supervisor as you are expected to be enrolled at the same campus as your supervisor. If your preferred supervisor is unable to accept new students, the admissions committee may recommend that you be admitted to one of the other two universities with a different supervisor.

All inquiries and applications concerning this program should be addressed to the Tri-University Graduate Program in History. The Tri-University Graduate Program uses a self-administered application process in which the onus is on the applicant to collect and submit all required documentation and material.

Applicants to the University of Waterloo

Please follow the regulations for applying as specified for the University of Waterloo online system. The online system is complete and requires no additional forms from the Tri-University Program

Applicants to the University of Guelph and Wilfrid Laurier University

Please follow the applications procedures for the University of Guelph or the Wilfrid Laurier University.

In addition, please fill in the preference form and include it in your application package. On this form, applicants to the PhD program can suggest a range of supervisors and fields. The admissions committee will use your application form together with your preference form when determining the department to which it will recommend your admission.

PhD Student Preference Form (PDF)

Instructions for Applicants (PDF)

Application Deadline

To be considered in the first round of admissions, applications must be received by 1 February. The admissions committee will, however, continue to review applications received after that date.

General Admission Requirements

Applications are considered by the Tri-University Graduate Program’s Admissions Committee and a recommendation for admission or rejection is forwarded to the dean of Graduate Studies at the proposed home university. Only students who are graduates of accredited universities and colleges are eligible for admission. Students will be admitted only after they have obtained an MA with at least an A- (80%) standing.

Since not all applicants can be admitted, close attention is paid to samples of applicants’ written work, applicants’ transcripts and past record as a whole, and to their statement of research interests. Applicants from outside Canada whose previous education cannot be assessed readily may be required to demonstrate their knowledge by other means such as the Graduate Record Examination.

Language Requirements

After acceptance, doctoral students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a second language. If no specific language is required for the student’s research (as authorized by the student’s advisory committee), the second language will be French. The determination of the second language will be made by the student’s advisory committee in the first term of the student’s registration in the program. During the first term of the doctoral program, a scheduled language exam will to evaluate the candidate’s reading knowledge of a second language, but it is not to be understood as a test of fluency. The use of a dictionary is allowed during the exam. Please see the PhD Program Handbook for more information on the exam.

Candidates for admission to the PhD program in history whose chosen area of research requires a language other than English must demonstrate sufficient language skills prior to admission. This is normally the equivalent of the skills acquired in a 200-level university course.

Non-Canadian applicants whose first language is other than French or English are required to submit evidence of proficiency in the English language or pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A net score of at least 600 is required. Please instruct the testing agency to forward official test results directly to the Director of the Tri-University Graduate Program in History.

Darryl Dee

Chris Nighman

Alex Statiev

Kimie Hara

Elizabeth Ewan

Renée Worringer

Dan Gorman

Norman Smith

John Laband

David Monod

Links

Associated Projects
Tri-U Library Electronic Resource Access

All students in the Tri-University Program are equally eligible to access electronic resources (e.g. journals and e-books) owned by any of the Tri-University Group libraries. Register with your home library:

Undergraduate History Societies
Guides for Graduate History Students

To enhance their skills as teachers, lecturers, and seminar instructors, this guide will lead teaching assistants through the various stages of their employment from signing a work agreement and meeting with the course instructor, to first class “jitters,” marking papers and exams, and initiating seminar discussions. Individual departments and faculty interested in initiating teaching assistant workshops and seminars will find sample training programs and additional resource materials.

This site is intended to provide guidance and practical advice to graduate history students in Canadian universities and junior history professors employed in Canadian institutions. In addition to updated information and an expanded bibliography of resource materials, this second edition includes new chapters on sessional jobs, postdoctoral fellowships, becoming a public historian, and pursuing a career outside the academy.

PhD Program Handbook

The PhD handbook provides a complete description of the program and its regulations. Students are advised to read the handbook carefully so as to familiarize themselves with the requirements of the doctoral program.

PhD Handbook 2014-15

 

Field Seminars

Major Fields

All Major Field Seminars are offered by the program each year. The seminars are designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the area of the major field. Students choose one major field seminar in their first year of study. Major fields are completed by a qualifying exam, in the same subject as the major field seminar, taken in the fourth term of registration. Teaching of the seminars rotates among the campuses each year. Students should select their campus of application not on the basis of the location of the major field seminar, but on the basis of the location of their preferred thesis advisor.

Immigrants enter the United States at Ellis Island, NY in this 1908 photo by Lewis Hine

Major Fields

Minor Fields

The minor fields represent each student’s secondary areas of concentration; they are designed to provide students with a supplementary teaching area and a comparative understanding of works in their dissertation research area. Students fulfill their minor field requirement by successfully completing two minor field seminars, normally in their first year of study. The topics of the seminars are established in consultation with the student and every effort is made to provide students with a list of the minor field seminars prior to their acceptance of an offer of admission. Successful completion of the seminars constitutes completion of the fields as there are no minor field examinations in the program.

Examples of Minor Field Seminars Offered in the Past

  • Sports History
  • Medieval History
  • International History
  • Economic History
  • Family & Gender History
  • Modern American History
  • Film & History
  • Legal History
  • Indigenous History
  • French Revolution
  • History of Science
  • Canadian Rural History
  • Mennonite History

MA Program Handbook

The MA handbook provides a full description of the program and its regulations. Students are advised to read the handbook carefully so as to familiarize themselves with the requirements of the Masters program.

MA Handbook 2019

Greta Kroeker

Tri-University History Conference Fall 2003

8 November 2003

History, Turning Points, and Ordinary Lives

The University of Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier University and the University of Waterloo present the 2003 Tri-University History Conference in the Ontario Veterinary College’s Lifetime Learning Centre.

This year’s conference theme seeks to explore the interconnections between ordinary people, their ordinary lives and historic moments or grand earth-shaking events and developments.

More than 25 speakers will present papers on topics ranging from aboriginal women to Jews and immigrants in Germany and Canada.

Program Highlights:

Early Morning Sessions:

  • “Lives Lived, Lives Lost: World War One and Its Aftermath”
  • “Hate, Redemption and Devaluation: Jews and Immigrants in Germany and Canada”
  • “Masquerading and Nudity: Cultural Interpretations in Canada and Africa”
  • “Death and Defence: Ireland and the United States”

Late Morning Sessions:

  • “Saints and Sinners? Publicans and Nuns in Ontario’s History”
  • “Subjects and Objects of Imperialism”
  • “Dependents and Trusteeship: Aboriginal Women and International Relations”
  • “Slavery, Captives and Captive Labour”
  • “The Body Alive and Dead: Insane Cadavers, Women Students in Canada and Disease in Angola”

Beverly Lemire, a history professor at the University of New Brunswick and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, will give the keynote address. She will speak on “Accounting for the Household: Gender and Culture of Household.”

Tri-University History Conference 2001

November 17, 2001

Reflections on the United Nations Year of the Volunteer: Volunteerism, Reform, Resistance & Revolution in History

Keynote Address by Elizabeth Dowdeswell (Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme): “The United Nations, Volunteerism & Responsibility”

Tri-University History Conference 2000

October 28, 2000

Race, Slavery and Migration

The 2000 Tri-University Conference was held at the University of Guelph in conjunction with the University of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier University.

Keynote address by Dr. David Eltis (Queen’s University): “Free and Slave Labour Regimes in Europe and the Americas, 1500-1880”.

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